A Day in the Life, or “When You See It, You See It Everywhere”


Emergency personnel transport Ricky Ray Rector to an ambulance after an apparent suicide attempt. Rector shot himself in the head after shooting police officer Robert Martin in Conway in 1981. Rector was later put to death for the murder (via ConwayPedia, click)

An older man enters, maybe 50 or younger. Unshaven. Black man, skinny. Not visibly dirtier than anyone else in here (read: granola) but the faint smell of body soil sits in the air where he passes. He enters and yells something unintelligible. Loud. Everyone pauses. No one looks. Except me. And I look away quickly.  It is clear that there is something not quite centered about him.

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Interlude: Zora Walker Wears Black for Troy Davis

Monica Barrow (left) of California reacts to news of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision with other protestors outside the prison. BarrowJessica McGowan/Getty Images

via the Innocence Project:

10 Things Anyone Can Do To Help Exonerate Innocent People and Prevent Wrongful Convictions

1. Get connected to stay informed and take action

Join the Innocence Project’s online community to receive regular updates, action alerts, in-depth news and analysis, and other information. Registration is free. Click here to join. Once you register, you can e-mail your friends, family and colleagues to ask them to sign up, too.

2. Donate to the Innocence Project

The Innocence Project is a nonprofit organization that relies on financial support from individuals and foundations. Your donation will help pay for DNA tests, provide staffing for case intake and litigation, support our reform initiatives nationwide, and help educate the public. Click to donate online or by mail.

3. Build relationships with elected representatives 

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I don’t understand

Byron Spellman, 16, left, Robert Coleman, 15, center, and Elijah West, 16, right, are a few of the local Savannah youths who stood in front of a crowd Saturday at Sacred Heart Church wearing t-shirts implying that they are Troy Davis. Image Credit: Hunter McRae/Savannah Morning News

I’m not sure what it means when we live in a society that applauds for the murder of 246 human beings by the state.

I’m not sure what it means when we celebrate death and see vengeance as a legit and appropriate response.

When did forgiveness become passé?  Or naive.  Or weak.

I don’t understand.  Where is the strength in taking a person’s life?  How does this build community?  Is someone going to get their house out of foreclosure because Davis is dead?  Is there a cure for AIDS involved?  Will his death prevent a young woman from being raped on her way home from work tomorrow–

[Wait.  Skip that one.  That’s for another post.]

I’m so confused.  And I kinda want to vomit.  Or move to Antarctica.

Instead, I write.  And I call.  Via @aliciasanchez:

Troy davis was denied clemency. keep calling if you can— When you call (404) 656-5651 Listen to the menu, press #5 for “Pardons,” Ask for DA Chisolm, Leave a message.

For more information, ask Zora Walker.

Maggies and Moments

For weeks months, I’ve been trying to do a Thursday Readin’ post on Nisi Shawl’s short story “Maggies.”

“Maggies,” from speculative fiction author Nisi Shawl’s 2008 Tiptree award-winning short story collection Filter House, will make any self-respecting Sable Fan Gyrl cheer and vomit at the same time.  Set in the future-verse colony of New Bahama, the narrator is a young, gender-neutral protagonist sent to live with their father after their mother falls ill.

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Interlude: The Sable Fan Gyrl Presents….

Robots of Brixton from Kibwe Tavares on Vimeo.

ROBOTS OF BRIXTON

Brixton has degenerated into a disregarded area inhabited by London’s new robot workforce – robots built and designed to carry out all of the tasks which humans are no longer inclined to do. The mechanical population of Brixton has rocketed, resulting in unplanned, cheap and quick additions to the skyline.

The film follows the trials and tribulations of young robots surviving at the sharp end of inner city life, living the predictable existence of a populous hemmed in by poverty, disillusionment and mass unemployment.  When the Police invade the one space which the robots can call their own, the fierce and strained relationship between the two sides explodes into an outbreak of violence echoing that of 1981.

 

via Factory Fifteen.  Another interesting video features an ambiguously brown girl or young woman, riding a train through “a suggestive re-representation of the existing and possible future.”  Lots of dark and twisty metal and empty spaces in this one.  #Prophetic

And if you still haven’t checked out “White” by A. Sayeeda Clarke, also full of speculative, afro-boricua futuristic goodness, then you are missing out.

In other news, N. K. Jemisin is dropping early chapters of the third book in her mind-blowing Inheritance trilogy, “The Kingdom of the Gods.”  And while I can’t look because I know I’ll be hooked and then all I’ll be able to do is curl up in a little ball on the floor of my room and rock and moan until the entire book is available for purchase, I encourage you to check them out.

Seriously.  Check them out.  And if you haven’t bought the first two in the trilogy, make that happen too.  Especially all yall who wanna buzz about the Help and justify your $15 movie ticket purchase with some foolishness about supporting black actresses.  Want to support black women making art?  Let’s go.  Don’t read books?  Buy it for a girl of color in your life who does (and yeah, I’m looking at you non-poc folks as well.  You’ve got at least one black friend.  Buy it for them.  They’ll appreciate it.  They may even thank you).

Besides, a book is whole lot cheaper than a movie ticket these days.